Tom Jenkins’ favourite sporting moments of the past decade – buy a Guardian photograph

Tom Jenkins’ favourite sporting moments of the past decade – buy a Guardian photograph

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Tom Jenkins’ favourite sporting moments of the past decade – buy a Guardian photograph

Tom Jenkins’ favourite sporting moments of the past decade – buy a Guardian photograph

From drama at the Grand National to London 2012, via England winning the Cricket World Cup, the Guardian and Observer sport photographer has picked his favourite images from thousands he has shot during the past 10 years. The Guardian is offering readers the chance to buy exclusive prints of Tom’s favourite photographs. A percentage of profits from every print sold will be donated to the charity Football Beyond Borders, an education charity that supports disadvantaged young people in the UK.

    Buy your print here for £100 including free delivery (30x40cm print size) Photographs are presented on museum-grade, fine-art paper stocks and are dispatched via Royal Mail. Global shipping is available. Email: [email protected]

    Carnage at the Chair, Grand National, Aintree – 9 April 2016I have a well-rehearsed plan at the Grand National – one that gives me as many angles and viewpoints as possible. Part of this strategy involves putting a couple of remote cameras at the largest fence on the course. That year I had a camera placed either side of the landing area. It was a filthy day, which meant the ground was soft and the horses were tiring. Luckily one of the remotes captured the moment Nina Carberry flew off her horse Sir Des Champs. For 25 years I had photographed the Chair during the Grand National, hoping one day my perseverance would pay off, and that day it did: this frame won best sports picture at the World Press Photo awards. Buy this print

    Carnage at the Chair, Grand National, Aintree 9 April 2016

    The cradle of cricket – 11 May 2019Hambledon Cricket Club 3rd XI players go for a run while batting against Portsmouth Cricket Club 3rd XI at Broadhalfpenny Down on the pitch where the first ever first-class game of cricket was played in 1772 near the village of Hambledon in Hampshire. Hambledon village is known as the cradle of cricket because that is where the rules and first proper game of cricket was held. Buy this print

    Hambledon Cricket Club 3rd XI players go for a run while batting against Portsmouth Cricket Club 3rd XI at Broadhalfpenny Down on the pitch where the first ever first-class game of cricket was played in 1772 near the village of Hambledon in Hampshire.

    England win the Cricket World Cup, Lord’s – 14 July 2019More than a year later and I still can’t believe what I witnessed that day at Lord’s. Compiling this decade review has given me the chance to revisit some wonderful moments – but nothing compares to this. For sheer sporting drama it takes the gold medal. England beating New Zealand to win the World Cup off the very last ball of a super over, with the teams tied after 50 overs each. I remember taking a deep breath before that final ball, trying to get my heart rate down, and then just trusting my instincts. Fortunately the run-out happened at the right end for me and I managed to get it. Buy the print

    England win the Cricket World Cup, Lord’s 14 July 2019

    Men’s 10,000m final, Glasgow Commonwealth Games – 1 August 2014It was a golden, sunlit evening in Glasgow, a rare occurrence that I had to make the most of. For a couple of hours I walked around the stadium, working on angles, trying to find the best spots to shoot the lengthening shadows. Luckily the 10,000m final was at exactly the right time. The light was perfect for only a few laps before the sun disappeared behind the back of the stands. Buy this print

    Men’s 10,000m final, Glasgow Commonwealth Games 1 August 2014

    Swansea mascot, Emirates Stadium – 10 September 2011As the Swansea team gathered for their huddle before kick-off, their young mascot looked disgruntled to be left out. It’s highly unusual to get a sweet, soft picture such as this at a high-profile Premier League match. I remember it was far better than any of the action pictures I took that game. Buy this print

    Swansea mascot, Emirates Stadium 10 September 2011

    Fen skating, Cambridgeshire – 9 January 2010The start of the decade brought freezing temperatures across Britain. This caused carnage with the fixture list so my mind turned to finding a sport that was thriving in the sub-zero temperatures. I discovered that for the first time since 1997 organised skating races were being held on a flooded field in the Fens. Luckily for me it was a beautiful day and produced scenes that reminded me of a Bruegel painting. It was hard to believe I was in the heart of England. The event hasn’t happened since. Buy this print

    Fen skating, Cambridgeshire 9 January 2010

    Track Cycling World Cup, Manchester – 20 February 2011Team pursuit qualifying lasts for more than an hour with teams competing against the clock one at a time. Not exactly thrilling stuff but it meant I had plenty of time to play with slow shutter speeds and lighting. I placed a strobe on the inside of the track and worked on different combinations of slow shutter speed and either keeping the camera still as the cyclists passed or reverse panning. I don’t often get the opportunity to experiment like this during a top event; it was a chance to create virtually my own little studio and have some fun. Buy this print

    Track Cycling World Cup, Manchester 20 February 2011

    England win the Ashes, Durham – 12 August 2013Australian batsman Peter Siddle lobs a catch straight to Jimmy Anderson at mid-off to give England the match and victory in the series. A few minutes earlier I was positioned straight on to the wicket at ground level where most of the other photographers were, when the most gorgeous evening light broke through threatening storm clouds. The view at Durham, over the pitch and across to Lumley Castle, is one of the best in cricket so I took a gamble and moved into the stands. As the final wicket fell I got this picture. My next frame was completely blocked by the arms of celebrating spectators. Buy this print

    England win the Ashes, Durham 12 August 2013

    Men’s squash final, Glasgow Commonwealth Games – 28 July 2014I managed to blag a shooting position right ‘by the tin’ shooting low down through the glass wall. As the final went on, I shifted position from the forehand side to the backhand. I realised by putting my lens right up against a glass-supporting strut in front of me I could achieve an amazing reflection. It wasn’t like a mirror, which is opaque, as you could also see through it. All I had to do was wait for the action to occur in exactly the right spot. I have been accused of tampering with this image in Photoshop. I admit it’s hard to work out but I swear it hasn’t been altered. Firstly, I am not allowed by my editorial code to do that but I’m also rubbish at Photoshop and don’t posses the necessary skills. Also this final was tight on deadline which meant I had to file immediately after the match, giving me no time for any retouching. Buy this print

    Men’s squash final, Glasgow Commonwealth Games 28 July 201

    Cheltenham spectators – 17 March 2010Taken at one of my favourite events of the year, this sums up the atmosphere at the Cheltenham Festival. Wherever you look there are pictures to be had both on the course and off. I spotted these two ladies and waited, hoping they would react in some way or another. Luckily for me but unluckily for horse and rider, a horse careered through the railings. Fortunately, everyone emerged unscathed. Buy this print

    Cheltenham spectators 17 March 2010

    World Cup beach football on Ipanema – 15 Jun 2014For the 2014 World Cup, I was based in Rio de Janeiro, where the England team had their training camp, and home of the giant Maracana stadium. It was also the base for thousands of fans from all over the world. I decided to document the endless games of football held by the fans, as well as locals, on the city beaches. Ipanema was visual heaven: as the sun went down behind the mountains, gorgeous colours would reflect off the wet sand and waves would crash in, a delicate salty mist wafting over the games of keepy-uppy. The atmosphere was wonderful too, everyone realising how special it was. Time on that beach was probably the highlight of the trip for me – far better than anything I witnessed at the actual World Cup. Buy this print

    World Cup beach football on Ipanema

    Michael Kacer, Invictus Games, Lee Valley Athletics Centre – 11 September 2014When I headed off to the first day of the inaugural Invictus Games, I wasn’t sure what to make of it. But when I saw this veteran with one arm missing, a scar down the side of his face and distinctive contact lenses, I knew I could get a striking image. Lying down behind the shot put circle enabled me to shoot up and use the cloudy sky as a clean background. I also had the lens wide open to throw all the focus on to that amazing, determined face. Buy this print

    Michael Kacer, Invictus Games, Lee Valley Athletics Centre 11 September 2014

    Nafi Thiam, World Athletics Championships, London – 5 August 2017The Belgian Olympic heptathlon champion, Nafi Thiam, was a model of consistency, easily winning her competition at the world championships. Her long braided hair makes for great pictures, but it’s especially graphic in the high jump. For me it was just a case of getting the background clean and waiting for the sun to come out so as to light up her face and hair perfectly. Buy this print

    Nafi Thiam, World Athletics Championships, London 5 August 2017

    Jessica Ennis wins the women’s heptathlon at the London 2012 Olympics – 4 August 2012A momentous day in British sporting history, one that will forever be named Super Saturday. It was the London Olympics and throughout the day Team GB were winning medals, many of them coloured gold. But it all reached its climax at the main stadium where Britain claimed three athletics golds in just 26 remarkable minutes. Jessica Ennis went into the Games as the poster girl, the athlete burdened with the most pressure. As she crossed the line to finish first in the 800m, the final event in her heptathlon, she knew she had won the ultimate prize. Arms out wide, head thrown back with exhaustion, the noise around the stadium was deafening. The nation was celebrating with her. Buy this print

    Jessica Ennis as she crosses the finishing line to win the women’s heptathlon at the London 2012 Olympics 4 August 2012

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